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How to Develop a Good Relationship with Your Boss

By: Maggie Lonsdale BA (hons) - Updated: 5 Sep 2015 | comments*Discuss
 
Be Preapred Work Hard Make An Effort

A good relationship with your boss can make all the difference to how you feel about your job.A supportive, approachable boss is able to get the best out of their team – you feel like you can talk to them about a problem you have, ask for a morning off to go to a school play or that they will listen to your reasons for wanting a pay rise at your annual review.

An egotistical, judgemental boss is quiet the opposite – they make you feel as though your personal life is of no importance, you should be grateful for the job and that you do not deserve for your career to progress.Of course, there are plenty of bosses in between.

Let’s look at some different ways to build a good relationship with your boss and how to maintain it – without looking like teachers’ pet.

Work Hard

– OK, this may seem like a simple one but it is very rare that the worst performer in a team gets on well with the boss, or certainly not for long.

Arrive on Time

– again, this is pretty obvious, but don’t forget that however well you perform in your job, if you are late all the time, or even some of the time, you wont be taken seriously.

Have Good Ideas

– in meetings, whether it be about the Christmas party or a new marketing strategy, make sure you have something to say. Meetings are not just a break from your desk and a chance to have free sandwiches.

Don’t Gossip

– if your boss considers you to be one of the team that spends more time hanging around the water cooler than actually working, they are unlikely to be your biggest fan.

Be Prepared

– if you attend a client visit or presentation with your boss, make sure you have your laptop loaded with a copy of the presentation, have back ups printed and have the client’s phone number in your mobile in case of hold ups.

Dress Like You Mean Business

– this does not mean wear a full-on power suit if you work in a primary school, but at least dress suitably to your role. It is too easy to get complacent and not iron your top or letting your suit jacket get a bit too ‘eau de pub’.

Take an Interest

– this goes for personal and professional details You don’t want to look like a creep by bringing your boss flowers for their birthday, but at least ask about their children, holiday or dinner parties if they tell you about them. When there is a project meeting, ask how it went.

Don’t Make a Fool of Yourself

– this goes for Friday night drinks, office romances and the Christmas party. Don’t drink too much at office functions, even if there is a free bar, it does not mean you should act like you are out with your friends – you’re not, it’s work, even if it is held on a Saturday night. Don’t let your colleagues see you fawning over Barry from accounts, either. Swoon in private.

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Jason - Your Question:
I am a middle manager in a manufacturing company looking after quality, health and safety, food safety, security, regulations and training single handedly for the past seven years. Prior to me joining the company eight years ago there used to be four in my department and it has been me alone for the past seven years. For four of the eight years I was underpaid for the position compared to similar positions within the profession and even within other plants in the organization. I approached my manager and the HR manager and I believe I am compensated enough now.Every department in the company has multiple employees and those that had left where replaced except for mine. There are several under performers and even talking to management and recording my findings, management does not see that there is a problem and I do not need help. I am always stressed out.
See the original comment for this part of the full post as it was too long to print with the answer
Since I joined the company I have given it 110+%. For having a senior manager tell the supervisor who abuses the company's time and resources daily really disillusioned me.Although I know Management knows that I am a valuable member of the team, I feel unappreciated. A middle manager said that I shouldn't complain to senior management because I will never get the resources I need and I am only going to make a fool of myself to senior management.I have seen the writing on the wall for many years and it is time to leave. Your thoughts?

Our Response:
Perhaps because you are good at your job it appears to onlookers/managers that you find it easy and do not need extra help resources. Unfortunately this is a common theme with many employers and you are taken for granted. A month or two without you being there would probably highlight this, but of course that's impractical from your point of view. Could you find a new job easily? If you were given an alternative role maybe you could use that as leverage to get extra help or to make your point with your existing employer. You'd then have the choice of staying or going. It's your decision really as you know more about your circumstances, home life and stress levels than we do. Would love to hear if any of our readers have any views on this?
WorkRelationships - 8-Sep-15 @ 12:03 PM
I am a middle manager in a manufacturing company looking after quality, health and safety, food safety, security, regulations and training single handedly for the past seven years. Prior to me joining the company eight years ago there used to be four in my department and it has been me alone for the past seven years. For four of the eight years I was underpaid for the position compared to similar positions within the profession and even within other plants in the organization. I approached my manager and the HR manager and I believe I am compensated enough now. Every department in the company has multiple employees and those that had left where replaced except for mine. There are several under performers and even talking to management and recording my findings, management does not see that there is a problem and I do not need help. I am always stressed out. When we had an audit two weeks ago, the audit team mentioned that the shipping and receiving office needs a log book for truckers to fill when entering the plant. I talked to the Shipping Supervisor and he agreed that I purchase him a log book that is hard bound so the pages does not become loose. So I purchase one. Yesterday, I brought him the note book and he got angry at me because it does not have the columns for date, company, name, time in, and time out. I said that he can do this himself and he doesn't have to do the whole book and only needs to do the pages when one becomes full. I should take a minute per page I said. He argued that he is not doing this because"I am not in school anymore and I am not wasting time drawing lines". He has perhaps the easiest job in the plant and spend 70% of his time chatting with other employees and watching pornography on the company's computer (management knows this and doesn't do anything). I emailed his manager (I record everything) and his manager blasted him for not doing a simple thing. The manager filled in a few pages because the supervisor still refused to draw the columns in the note book. The manager also got mad at me because I copied my manager in the email. Later in the day, a senior manager visited the Shipping Supervisor and said that it was a waste of his time doing the columns and he will ask the receptionist to find a book that has everything filled in that he needs. Since I joined the company I have given it 110+%. For having a senior manager tell the supervisor who abuses the company's time and resources daily really disillusioned me. Although I know Management knows that I am a valuable member of the team, I feel unappreciated. A middle manager said that I shouldn't complain to senior management because I will never get the resources I need and I am only going to make a fool of myself to senior management. I have seen the writing on the wall for many years and it is time to leave. Your thoughts?
Jason - 5-Sep-15 @ 6:53 PM
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